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20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
promising partnerships that are occurring. san francisco unified school district's vision for student success, we do expect that every student who enrolls in our schools will graduate from high school, will be ready for college and career and be equipped with the skills to be successful in the 21st century. san francisco unified adopted a bold strategic plan with three goals focused on access and equity, student achievement, and account ability. -- and accountability. and there are six key milestones our superintendent has laid out toward measuring our progress and student goals. there are a few in here i want to highlight. they're kind of chronological starting with the first milestone, and that's the percentage of students who are ready for kindergarten. and that's important to today's topic because 30% of our students, based on our assessment, are actually showing up ready for kindergarten. so, that is a point of input. we then have a fourth grade milestone where you see that number after a few years has gone up a bit to 70 and 72% for meaning in which language arts and math standa
and preparing students for successful graduation in 2014 and beyond. san francisco unified district in collaboration with the city and county of san francisco together identify the financial resources for crisis intervention making a broken promise and truly supporting all students in being successful, not just some. focusing on offering credit recovery opportunities like seventh period available at each high school for struggling students with a teacher present, not just online cyber high. prioritizing the students most at risk of not graduating for the classes of 2014 and 2015. smaller classes sizes for the key a through g classes and academic support and tutoring for students not on track for graduation. where there are many things the select committee can recommend and move on to both body, we are encouraging each one of you to take into account, like i said, the urgency and figuring out how we are going to graduate 2014 and 2015. thank you for your time. >> thank you very much. colleagues, any questions? (applause) >> on the presentation? supervisor olague. >> i guess i was won
is these are students that are both not finishing school uc or ucs eligible and not graduating san francisco unified school district with a diploma if this pattern persists. so, just to call it out, for our 2014 class, african-american students, those are 246 kids today not on track. these are students that are not performing with a d or better in their required courses and only 76 that are on track if you look at the minimal requirements. if you see the 2015 class, you see that number there. now, of course, as they become juniors and seniors, you'll notice that the sequence gets even a little more stringent. so, the big question is what are some of the strategic actions and interventionses for closing this achievement gap, which is persisted for generations? >> commissioner. >> excuse me, deputy lieutenant. i have a question or clarification on the last slide. does that include students that are just in our regular schools or does that include our county schools? >> good afternoon, bill sanders, director division of curriculum instruction. it includes all students in that grade. >> okay, thank you.
, there is a [speaker not understood]. >> you heard both presentations, one from the san francisco unified school district and the other one from dcyf. could you give me your gut reaction or some -- if you can -- or you can give me some kind of -- some thoughts that you were thinking as you were listening to some of the data you presented today. >> yes, mr. chair, and supervisor cohen. there is actually data the school district provided is promising the children for tomorrow, right. we're dealing with a crisis of high school students today and the issue is they did not present any recommendations on how to resolve the issues that are facing us today. and, so, when we get to figuring out how we can get the school district to not just also prepare students at kindergarten and the rest of the elementary grades, but also focusing on the students that were not given adequate education that they deserved yesterday, then i can talk about that. >> so, you probably know what the numbers were looking like 10 years ago as i was. thank you, mr. chair. that's all i have. >> colleagues, i'd like to turn it ove
for a positive and great city known as san francisco. we are here today to ensure that all the partners who stand to get our unified as one and in the spirit of the rev. jesse jackson, we want to make sure that san francisco for our youth and communities, we continue to keep hope alive. thank you. [applause] >> part of keeping hope alive is we have to provide an economic engine to get our young people back to work so they are able to take care of themselves and oftentimes their families. with that, i would like to introduce to you mr. eric mcdonald, the executive director of the united way. thank you. [applause] >> good morning again. welcome, everyone. we are excited and thrilled to be partners here with the mayor. what is clear is that while the unfortunate rise and peak of gun violence brings us to the room, it also gives us what we believe is an enormous opportunity. these spikes, ago, and what we have now is an opportunity to cast a vision. we know that without a vision, people perish. we can cast a vision and develop an action plan that is based upon mutual respect, mutual trust, and mutual
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)